Monday, October 17, 2011

Slow Cooked Lamb Shanks

First of all, I like the name of this cut. Lamb Shank. Shank. When I bought these, I really didn't know what a shank was, so I looked it up.

Urban Dictionary says it's a home made knife. Oops, not that kind of shank.

About.com definition:

A cut of lamb taken from either the shoulder (fore shank) and arm of a lamb or the upper part of the leg (hind shank). The fore shank will includes part of the shoulder, as well as part of the leg, while the hind shank will include only part of the rear leg. Lamb shanks have a paper-thin membranous covering and a thin layer of fat. While a lamb shank is leaner than the sirloin part of a lamb, the meat can be tough. This cut of lamb is often braised or roasted.


If you follow/like me on facebook, then you've seen that I don't make any apologies for my love of lamb. It's certainly my favorite animal to eat. Though I've never had elk, or alligator, and I've heard those are quite tasty.






Lamb is, in my super expert opinion, a very forgiving meat. You really can't mess it up. Unless you poured coke on top...that would probably be a sin. Throw on some garlic, a little salt, some rosemary, and you'll have a dish that will make you close your eyes and moan softly. Yes, ma'am.

The best cuts of lamb are the fatty cuts. Because lamb fat melts in your mouth and has tons of flavor. I'm just throwing that out there. Eat the lamb fat.

And please do not forget to take a garlic clove and shmush it on top of the meat. Thank you The Food Lovers' Primal Palate for introducing to that piece of wisdom. 



Slow Cooked (Grokpot) Lamb Shanks
  • 4 lamb shanks (or as many that will fit in your crock)
  • 6-8 peeled garlic cloves
  • 1 onion, roughly chopped
  • salt
  • pepper
  • rosemary (fresh or dried)
  • All purpose seasoning blend (I like the one from simply organic). This is even optional. 

Generously sprinkle salt and your seasoning blend on top of the lamb shanks. Not so generously sprinkle on a little pepper. Rub it in. Put your garlic cloves into the crock. Add the rubbed shanks. Sprinkle on your rosemary. Use about a TBSP of it. If you have fresh, just lay a sprig of it on top. Set your grokpot on low and let it cook until the meat is falling off the bone (7-8 hours). 

I realize I'm not giving you exact measurements...but you'll be okay. I promise. Just eyeball it. If you're very worried it won't turn out, then add some crumbled bacon into the mix. You really can't screw this up. If you do, please write me some hate mail.













6 comments:

  1. Could you do a leg of lamb the same way?

    ReplyDelete
  2. I've made this recipe quite a few times, and it's always amazing. Just wanted to say thanks!!

    ReplyDelete
  3. Can I do venison shank the same way?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I haven't tried that, but I think you could!

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